Awards

AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Environmental Statement Award Winner
Environmental Statement Award
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Jason Kamin CA

"The Watchman" (Oil)

"The Watchman" is a painting six years in the making. I had photographed Himalayan Griffon Vultures while on a trekking expedition in 2012 to the remote village of Phu (Phugaun) in Nepal. Being April, high elevation wildlife was still laying low from winter's grip and difficult to spot. Seeing these birds always lifted my spirit - they are absolutely magnificent. Being such a huge bird, I would only paint it on a big canvas. I started the concept of the painting soon after I returned from the expedition, but was pulled in other directions, and I ended up putting it on the shelf until recently. Creating such large paintings can be overwhelming. I had to force myself to get over some of the more challenging aspects and almost gave up on it. In the end, I am glad I pushed through. The Himalayan Griffon Vulture (Gyps himalayensis) is currently one of the least affected species of vultures currently in rapid decline around the world - likely due to its remote habitat and importance by Buddhist culture for sky burials. It is listed as Near Threatened under the IUCN Red List, with expected declines to occur within only a few generations.

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The Watchman | Wallhanging by Jason Kamin | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

James Hough AU

"Sanctuary" (Acrylic)

I have visited Tasmania a number of times and have always been attracted to the beauty of the Green Rosella. This is the first painting I have done of this bird. A damp, ferny gully was the perfect setting to display the rich yellows, reds and ultramarines of the bird with soft yellow-green foliage of the draping ferns. I deliberately repeated color from the birds into their surrounds, from the orange-margined feathers with the small fruits in the foreground and the bright ultramarine blues of the birds' cheeks and wings with the reflected light beneath the limb. The space to the left of the birds was left soft and quiet, giving them room to look into and escape to.

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Sanctuary | Wallhanging by James Hough | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Best of Show Award Winner

Tony Mayo CA

"Battle of the Orca and Thunderbird" (Stone)

The Cowichan people on the West Coast of Canada have a legend regarding a battle between a Killer Whale (Orca) and the Thunderbird. There was a time during one spawning season when absolutely no salmon came up the Cowichan River. Salmon were an important food source that sustained the Cowichan people through the winter, so they scouted the river and discovered a supernatural Orca had claimed the mouth of the Cowichan River and was mercilessly eating the salmon. The Cowichan people paddled their mighty war canoes out to the Orca, but trying with all their strength, they could not drive away the huge Orca. The medicine people of every Cowichan village were joined by all the people as they sang their most powerful songs, calling upon supernatural Thunderbird for help. Thunderbird appeared and was soon locked in a fierce battle with the Orca. Thunderbird was victorious and the salmon run was liberated. In this sculpture, the Orca and Thunderbird can be seen interlocked in battle with Thunderbird latched tightly around the belly of the Orca. Sculpted from Pyrophyllite from South Africa and suspended with an acrylic rod above a beautiful base of hand-cut and polished Aventurine from Brazil.

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Battle of the Orca and Thunderbird | Sculpture by Tony Mayo | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Michael Dumas CA

"Looking Out" (Oil)

A few years ago I happened to be exploring the interior of Bellamy’s Mill at Morrisburg, Ontario. The light coming in from two opposing windows, one close at hand and the other some distance away, created a mood that I found quite compelling. This provided both direct and indirect illumination of the full sacks of flour lined up in rows along the wall. I had just noticed an Eastern Phoebe nearby before entering the mill and the two experiences fell naturally into place when I planned the painting some time later.

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Looking Out | Wallhanging by Michael Dumas | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Michael Dumas CA

"Northern Cross" (Oil)

Bird of prey hybrids are most often the result of cross-breeding programs by falconers with the intent of joining certain features deemed desirable for their sport. The bird portrayed in Northern Cross is an example of this type of hybridization. However, a 2004 paper co-authored by Valeri Moseikin and David H. Ellis (raptors-international .org) investigate the interesting possibility of similar hybrids being produced in the wild. ‘There is one habitat type shared by both Sakers and Altai Gyrfalcons. In the south-eastern portion of the Russian Altai, there are areas of extensive cold steppe above 2000m. Here it is possible to find mixed pairs of Altai Gyrfalcons and Sakers. Here it is also normal to find birds with attributes of both morphs (i.e. presumably natural hybrids). ‘

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Northern Cross | Wallhanging by Michael Dumas | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

James Hough AU

"Times Like This" (Acrylic)

Every now and then a wildlife image that just has to be painted without any editing or compositional adjustment presents itself to you. Late in the afternoon, as the sun was almost below the horizon, this Laughing Kookaburra sat looking down at me as I set up my camp for the night. The rich yellow light filtered through the eucalyptus leaves and set them off like little lanterns. The Laughing Kookaburra is perhaps the most recognized of all Australian birds because of its chuckling voice, and it too was bathed in the beautiful afternoon glow. It is one of the ten kingfishers found in Australia.

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Times Like This | Wallhanging by James Hough | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Hans Kappel DE

"Mumble" (Oil)

Although it had not been my intention to paint “Mumble”, I always had this name in mind since I read the book “The Owl Who Liked Sitting on Caesar” by Martin Windrow. Tawny owls are common birds where I live, and in winter I often hear them calling at night.

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Mumble | Wallhanging by Hans Kappel | Artists for Conservation 2018
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

David Kitler CA

"“Cordón Sanitario” " (Acrylic)

“Cordon sanitaire” is a French term referring to “a barrier implemented to stop the spread of disease”. In English it has been used in a metaphorical sense referring to attempts at preventing the spread of an unwanted ideology. Both definitions apply, but I chose the Spanish translation since this fallen sign stood sentinel at the edge of a protected area in Mexico. In stark contrast to the safety found inside this sanctuary, was the “ring of filth” that appeared as I neared its extremities, culminating mere meters away from this boundary marker with one of the most flagrant examples of waste and destructiveness I have witnessed - shark finning. In the makeshift fish camp straddling the border of the refuge I found this still writhing shark (and its dead siblings) set aside to be used as bait to attract the next of their kin. I surreptitiously transferred this pup into the blood-tinged waters of the Sea of Cortez for a first swim – the still visible umbilical cord indicating its premature removal from its mother’s womb.

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“Cordón Sanitario”   | Wallhanging by David Kitler | Artists for Conservation 2018

2023 Artists for Conservation Exhibit Book