Awards

AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Gemma Gylling US

"A Sudden Encounter I & II" (Colored pencil)

To me, one of the best parts of creating my art is to photograph the animal myself and then to come up with a design/composition that is all my own. I often visit Triple D Wildlife, in Kalispell, MT, to photograph their animals and use those photos to create my art. The reference photo used for this artwork, was taken in January 2018, in the snow, which was a really fun experience in itself. The mountain lion’s name is Kali, she is a VERY active cat and is a ton of fun to photograph. She climbs the trees and literally flies from one treetop to another; it can be very exciting!

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A Sudden Encounter I & II | Wallhanging by Gemma Gylling | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Best of Show Award Winner
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Martin Hayward-Harris GB

"GYRFALCON" (Bronze)

Female Gyrfalcon in action with wings ready to open and legs extended to leap from the block.

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GYRFALCON | Sculpture by Martin Hayward-Harris | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Environmental Statement Award Winner
Environmental Statement Award

Simon Levasseur FR

"Climate Encounter I" (Oil)

A Polar Bear and two Komodo dragons treat themselves with cuddles, at a time when most of their natural habitat is threatened by climate change and human activities. This artwork and its egg-shape construction illustrate the pressure on the natural world but also shows the incredible resilience of nature as these animals still find love and solace.

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Climate Encounter I | Wallhanging by Sailev | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Interpretive/Abstract Award Winner
Best Interpretive / Abstract

Lorna Hamilton GB

"Ring Angels" (Mixed media)

'Ring Angels' refer to the strange phenomenon discovered in 1958. Scientists were perplexed at the strange lights appearing on their radar screens. The light resembled ripples on a pond, with rings of light appearing for 2 and a half to 6 minutes before completely disappearing! There were many sightings of 'Ring Angels' around England but it wasn't until a year later that the strange occurrence was understood. Scientists realized that what they were seeing each morning, were Starlings leaving their roosting grounds, in waves separated by 3 minute intervals!

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Ring Angels | Wallhanging by Lorna Hamilton | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence
John Seerey-Lester Memorial Award Winner
John Seerey-Lester Award

Luke Raffin CA

"Hanging Out "Belted Kingfisher"" (Acrylic)

This painting was first inspired by the weathered wood pilings at Westview Wharf, where cormorants have taken over the ghostly structure. Later I had the pleasure of watching a kingfisher doing a balancing act on one of the chains. The Belted Kingfisher is easy to identify - stocky with a large head , bushy crest and large dark bill. This noisy fishing bird is one of my favorite west coast birds.

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Hanging Out "Belted Kingfisher" | Wallhanging by Luke Raffin | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Sophie Green GB

"The March" (Acrylic)

‘The March’ depicts the necessary, but perilous event of migration during a snow storm. Changes in temperature, food shortages or the need to mate, among other factors, make migration an important event. However, it is usually long, arduous and full of difficulties – particularly for juvenile or older penguins, who may not survive the journey. My aim was to draw the viewer’s attention to both the individual penguins’ behaviour, as well as the dynamic of the group as a whole. This piece was a finalist and deemed ‘highly commended’ in the David Shepherd Wildlife Artist of the Year competition.

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The March | Wallhanging by Sophie Green | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Laura Levitsky CA

"Quiet Pursuit" (Acrylic)

The Canadian Lynx is as mystical to me as owls, as they are rarely seen. They are calculating and patient hunters relying on a sneaky approach to catching their prey. Their main source of food is the snowshoe hare. They are so linked to the snowshoe hare that their populations rise and fall with the cycle of hare numbers. Their large paws allow them to maneuver through deep winter snow to track and catch their prey. I added the snowshoe hare prints to create more of a story line. Their habitat is older mature forests, however, with climate change, deforestation and road-building, the survival of the lynx, and a long list of our planets wild animals are at risk.

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Quiet Pursuit | Wallhanging by Laura Levitsky | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Calvin Nicholls CA

"Malamuzhakki - Great Hornbills " ()

Observers claim their percussive wingbeats sound like a freight-train, prompting the title using a word from the local language of the Malayalam people. Cavernous casques, absence of underwing coverts, and demonstrative devotion to their mates who remain ensconced in sealed tree cavities while incubating their eggs, all serve to secure them formidable status in the avian world. Yet in the midst of vanishing habitat, their value is lost to that of the price of lumber and promise of agricultural commerce. The complicated forces at play have yielded somewhat recently, offering promise for better times. However, reverence to these fine creatures of the sky can only be assured through continued discussion and thoughtful debate. The client who collaborated with me on this piece, contributes substantially to the well being of these fine birds. My intent was to represent them in a manner that inspires others in their own small way, to do the same.

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Malamuzhakki - Great Hornbills  | Wallhanging by Calvin Nicholls | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Sharon K. Schafer US

"Sonoran Shade: Hanging Chain Cholla and Cactus Wren" (Acrylic)

Cactus wrens are wrens with attitude. Large, loud, and raucous, this wren demands attention. This species is endemic to the deserts of the southwestern United States and northern and central Mexico. At 7 - 8 inches, the Cactus Wren is far larger than other wrens found on the continent. Its common name is derived from this bird’s fondness for stands of desert cactus. It is there where the Cactus Wren pairs, who are these life long partners, set up and defend their territory, build their bulky conspicuous nests, and raise their broods, while protected by the formidable needles and dense branches of the cactus.

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Sonoran Shade: Hanging Chain Cholla and Cactus Wren | Wallhanging by Sharon K. Schafer | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Chirag Thumbar IN

"Black-headed Jay" (Acrylic)

I enjoyed watching a pair of black-headed jays hanging out on a rhododendron tree during my birding trip to the Himalayan foothills. In this painting I tried to capture the action and the play of light on the birds.

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Black-headed Jay | Wallhanging by Chirag Thumbar | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Medal of Excellence Award Winner
Medal of Excellence

Charlotte Williams GB

"We're All Ears" (Graphite/pencil)

African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus) or Painted Wolves, because of their unique 'painted' patches, are sadly, like so many other creatures, critically endangered. This is due to habitat loss, threat from farmers fearing for their livestock, and their susceptibility to canine diseases such as rabies and distemper. These dogs are very effective, cooperative hunters who live in packs of up to 20 or more, lead by a monogamous breeding pair, who are pictured here. In this drawing I wanted their loyalty, sociability and intelligence to shine through. I also wanted to show their beautiful markings and how they look out for each other and their sense of affection and caring. It is known that they will share food and assist weakened members of the pack. Several images of an actual pair were used as reference to create this piece.

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We're All Ears | Wallhanging by Charlotte Williams | Artists for Conservation 2021
Pollyanna Pickering Memorial Award Winner
Pollyanna Pickering Award

Douglass Lockyer NZ

"Tim, One of the Last and Largest Giant Tuskers" (Watercolor)

Tim, one of the last and largest of Kenya's giant tusker elephants, died last year in March, 2020. He was 50 years old and had become beloved of millions worldwide, due to not only his statuesque dimensions and spectacular tusks, but also for his placid nature. The watercolor was done in commemoration, using a sea salt texturing technique and was painted with Daniel Smith watercolors on Lanaquarelle 300 lb cold press, 100% cotton watercolor paper, over a period of around two and a half weeks.

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Tim, One of the Last and Largest Giant Tuskers | Wallhanging by Douglass Lockyer | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Western Art Collector Magazine Award Winner

Guy Coheleach US

"Great Blue Heron Pair" (Oil)

These large waterbirds are graceful, whether they are standing, perching, or flying. Great blues are a pleasure for me to paint. They are beautiful enough to make even a modest painting attempt look good. The great blue is certainly one of my favorite birds. They seem to be able to eat anything that they can catch. Here in a Florida pond I passed one in the morning trying to swallow a very large bass. A couple of hours later when I passed him again, there he was, still trying to swallow that bass.

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Great Blue Heron Pair | Wallhanging by Guy Coheleach | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Don Alemany CA

"Rejoice" (Sculpture)

Rejoice is a piece to welcome the return of spring and the arrival of the birds and leaves.

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Rejoice | Sculpture by Don Alemany | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Don Alemany CA

"Lord Strutt" (Wood)

Decked out in ruffles and lace, Lord Strutt crosses the forest floor in hopes of attracting a noble lady. Let the spring ritual begin.

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Lord Strutt | Sculpture by Don Alemany | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Guy Combes US

"Maelstrom" (Oil)

Female jaguar with abstract background.

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Maelstrom | Wallhanging by Guy Combes | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Michael Dumas CA

"Winter Drift" (Oil)

The day was cold and bright. Cool shadows of winter-pressed goldenrod curved across the snow. Out of the corner of my eye a dark form passed by quickly, leaving a half formed impression of wide spread wings against a background of blue. Later, in the studio that memory slowly emerged, and was slowly brought to life in painted form.

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Winter Drift | Wallhanging by Michael Dumas | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Michael Dumas CA

"Faded Blue" (Oil)

My jacket, once a rich dark blue has faded over the years. I wore it last spring when I had to take down a large dead tree by the lake. By noon the day had warmed to the point that I took off the jacket, leaving it behind when I went for lunch. Upon my return, the light had changed in such a pleasing way that I could envision my unplanned arrangements of items in painted form. Several studies were made before disturbing the composition and finally complete the work of the log's disposal. The nuthatch provided a single spark of life and movement in contrast to all the objects in repose.

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Faded Blue | Wallhanging by Michael Dumas | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

James Fiorentino US

"Portrait of a Cheetah " (Watercolor)

I have always been fascinated with Cheetahs simply because they are the fastest land animals in the world. Like all big cats they are some of the most beautiful creatures on the planet. Like many threatened species habitat loss and human conflict have played a significant role. Protecting the Cheetah now is so important to its survival.

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Portrait of a Cheetah  | Wallhanging by James Fiorentino | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Garry Fleming AU

"King Kibulu" (Oil)

This is painted with Artisan oils on rag board. He was a rescued Lion - the last from the Australian circus circuit. He now lives in a Lion sanctuary called Zambi Wildlife retreat on the outskirts of Sydney.

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King Kibulu | Wallhanging by Garry Fleming | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Elke Gröning DE

"Morning Air Smelling" (Colored pencil)

Looking somehow like a simple mouse, the Bushveld Sengi (Elephantulus intufi), belongs to the strange little mammal order Macroscelidea, (20 species). All the sengis/elephant shrews alive today and fossil, are distributed in Africa. Sengis have short arms and a very elongated snout and hind legs. My friends and I would watch them in the Etosha National Park during our trip through Namibia in 2005.

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Morning Air Smelling | Wallhanging by Dr. Elke Gröning | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Elke Gröning DE

"Strangler Fig Leprechaun" (Colored pencil)

The tarsiers are a small primate Family (14 species), located in the phylogenetic tree at the base of the apes. They are highly specialized mammals (eyes, locomotion). Carlito syrichta, the Philippine Tarsier, has very large eyes. When light falls on the pupils, they become small horizontal rods, looking like the eyes of a mantis insect. In darkness they are huge. I know tarsiers from different animal night houses in zoological gardens.

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Strangler Fig Leprechaun | Wallhanging by Dr. Elke Gröning | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Sandra Jones GB

"Charly" (Pastels)

Charly was painted to raise money for the MONA Foundation’s charity auction. A rescue monkey in Spain, he sadly passed in 2020. Born in Valencia, he belonged to a trainer who rented him for different purposes such as television ads, movies, circuses, etc. Behind the scenes, Charly lived a life of hardship, locked in a tiny cage in a truck. He was part of MONA’s first ever rescue and one of the best that adapted to his new life. The painting sold at auction – my husband purchased it in secret! He has kindly allowed for me to sell on.

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Charly | Wallhanging by Sandra Jones | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Bruce Lawes CA

"Only Have Eyes for You" (Oil)

‘Only Have Eyes for You’ is a painting that I was inspired to do in order to capture the intense gaze of this apex predator. You would never want to be on the other end of this gaze. Although lions sleep 16 to 20 hours a day, when they are awake there is only one thing on their mind -ok- maybe two, but food is at the top of the agenda. Although my painting is a portrait, I hope it captures the spirit of this noble animal and gives you the feeling that you too, could be next, under the wrong circumstances.

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Only Have Eyes for You | Wallhanging by Bruce Lawes | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Harro Maass DE

"We Love Mice" (Acrylic)

A snack for the Eagle Owl. For the little one a meal. The poor victim Is always the mouse, but in this case, the mouse is hidden and safe.

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We Love Mice | Wallhanging by Harro Maass | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Michael Pape CA

"Invincible - Siberian Tiger" (Acrylic)

When composing this exclusive original wildlife painting there are many elements to this story, I wish to share with you. The idea was to create this Siberian Tiger as a large painting symbolizing hope, a warrior of tales told and battles won, through international awareness, another chance to remain consequential. The challenge was to paint the many subtleties to this piece and create a ghost like feeling, with sensitivity and vulnerability, but at the same time for the largest, most powerful cat in the world, the forward emotion of “Invincible”.

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Invincible - Siberian Tiger | Wallhanging by Michael Pape | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Matt Patterson US

"Bog Turtle" (Acrylic)

For those of you who don't recognize this little animal... it's a bog turtle! It is an amazing reptile that is the smallest turtle species in North America and one of the most endangered. A few years ago, I was able to tag along with Fish and Wildlife and my partner on 'The Snake And The Salamander' book, in order to see one of these turtles in the wild. The site we were at had pitcher plants and LOTS of poison sumac! I also saw the jawbone from a deer nestled in the vegetation near the spot where we found a bog turtle. A strange little scene that I have been wanting to paint for a while. This is just one of over three hundred incredible turtle species in the world. Some turtles are the vultures of ponds, lakes, and rivers, eating dead and decaying animals and plants. Gopher tortoises are considered a keystone species, meaning other species depend on them to survive. Other turtles keep certain species of mollusks from overpopulating which would otherwise cause damage to their environments. There is a long list of why turtles are important! Today over 50% of the almost 360 species are declining and are threatened or endangered. They are collected and sold illegally as pets or as food. Many are declining due to habitat loss, road mortality and climate change. If the temperature is even a few degrees warmer there will be an unbalance of males and females in populations.

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Bog Turtle | Wallhanging by Matt Patterson | Artists for Conservation 2021
AFC Honorable Mention Award Winner
Honorable Mention Award Winner

Edward Spera CA

"Hi" (Acrylic)

Inspired by Volcanoes Nat. Park, Rwanda.

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Hi | Wallhanging by Edward Spera | Artists for Conservation 2021

2023 Artists for Conservation Exhibit Book