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Terry Mathews

AFC Conservation Artist of the Month for September, 2005

Terry is a strong supporter of conservation organizations, having contributed many bronzes to a number of conservation organizations including: Game Conservation International (contributed ten bronzes), Friends of Conservation, Kuki Gallmann's Ranch, The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, Rhino Rescue, Rhino Ark, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi National Park, East African Wildlife Society, Cullman & Hurt Community Wildlife Project (Terry was Vice Chairman for a number of years and contributed three bronzes ) and, World Wide Fund for Nature. In addition, he is on the Advisory Committee of the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and in 1990 donated a full size Rhino Cow and Calf to act as a begging bowl for the Rhino Conservation Movement which now stands at the entrance to the Nairobi National Park. Later Terry was commissioned by the WWF and the East Africa Wildlife Society to build a monument to the burning of the ivory. The bronze was cast by Terry's son Dennis in Nairobi and provided at cost. It now stands at the site of the original burning of the 12 tons of ivory. 
 
 Terry Mathews was born in 1931, brought up in Uganda, and educated in Kenya and England. His life as a child in Uganda was enriched by his close association with his next door neighbour, Captain Charles Pitman, the renowned Chief Game Warden of that country. Terry also wanted to be a game warden, but was both too young and married when he applied to the Kenya Game Department after working for a few years in the bush as a survey cadet with the Survey of Kenya. In 1956 he joined Ker & Downey Safaris Ltd. as an apprentice under Syd Downey, completing his training in 1958. Later, as a well-known and successful professional hunter in Kenya, he was much sought after as a guide on photo and hunting safaris. He left Ker & Downey in 1967 to form, with his wife, their own company, Mathews Safaris Ltd., which still prospers.Since 1968, when Terry lost the sight in his left eye in a shotgun accident, he has concentrated more on what up until that time was his secondary profession, sculpture.  He and his wife Jeanne still conduct safaris, but confine them to photo, nature watching and ornithological trips. His work has been shown in Europe, Africa and the United States. Not satisfied with strict representational style he takes liberties where he feels they are warranted. The mood of the piece is more important than the exact muscle form, though he has a good knowledge of how animals are put together. The movement ... the sense of purpose ... or the lack of it are the goal.

Previous Conservation Artists of the Month

(October, 2017)
(September, 2017)
(August, 2017)
(July, 2017)
(June, 2017)
(May, 2017)
(April, 2017)
(March, 2017)
(February, 2017)
(January, 2017)
(December, 2016)
(November, 2016)
(October, 2016)
(September, 2016)
(August, 2016)
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