AFC Blog - Featuring compelling articles by nature art and conservation leaders

AFC's Blog

At AFC, our vision is to lead a global artistic movement that inspires individuals and organizations to preserve and sustain our natural heritage by uniting the talent and passion of the world’s most gifted nature artists. This blog has been created as a means for AFC leadership to share thoughts and expertise about topics relating to art and conservation, featuring regular articles by AFC President, Jeff Whiting, and a range of guest bloggers.

Posted on Thursday, May 9, 2019 by AFC
Artists for Conservation

Vancouver, BC., CANADA - May 9, 2019 - Artists for Conservation (AFC) is pleased to announce a new partnership and special exhibit tour at the James Museum of Western and Wildlife Art in St. Petersburg, Florida. The exhibit is scheduled to run from March through May, 2021, and featuring artwork from the 2020 edition of AFC's annual juried exhibit.

The James museum first opened its doors to the public in 2018, The museum was founded by American billionaire businessman, and chairman of Raymond James Financial, Thomas James and wife, Mary. The museum's permanent colloection includes thousands of pieces from the James' collection, including both contemporary and traditional works. The 84,000 square foot (~8000 m2) facility features 30,000 sq. ft of gallery space, an auditorium, museum shop and café. The museum is centrally located, near the waterfront and business districts and a short walk from another major artistic attraction - the Salvador Dalí Museum...

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Posted on Thursday, April 14, 2011 by Ria Winters
Artists for Conservation

This is a painting of the beautiful blue Spix's macaw Cyanopsitta spixii, and  the only species in its genus which makes it monotypic. The painting was part of the 2009 AFC exhibit held at the Hiram Blauvelt Art Museum in New Jersey.

Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2011 by Carel Brest van Kempen
Artists for Conservation

 

I turned 14 in May of 1972, and like any self-respecting country boy of that age, I looked forward to the impending emergence of hibernating frogs. Three ponds near my home harbored good populations of Northern Leopard Frogs,  and each summer I brought home several eggs to watch the twitching embryos grow within their gelatinous orbs before bursting from them and metamorphosing into small frogs over the summer.

Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011 by Rachel Dillon
Through Endangered Eyes - Book by AFC Artist, Rachel Dillon

 

I have one goal when I walk into an elementary school classroom: to teach kids why they need to care about endangered species. I'm not a biologist, or a scientist, I'm an artist with a slightly different approach to things.

My presentation starts with what inspired me to create my non-fiction children's picture book, "Through Endangered Eyes - a poetic journey into the wild" - my passion to help animals in trouble. I tell them that I believe every creature has a job to do on the planet, and when one species disappears, the world becomes unbalanced.

Connecting the Dots
Posted on Sunday, February 20, 2011 by Kelly Dodge
Artists for Conservation

This morning I woke up to the ear piercing pulse of the Starship Enterprise's "red alert" alarm. Apparently I watched a lot of Star Trek during the formative years of Hoover's life. (Yeah, yeah, I'm a closet Trekky). Brad and I often wake up to the sounds of crows cawing, ambulance sirens screaming or the melodic song of a cardinal....all coming from the kitchen. The culprit is Hoover, our chatty, captive-raised, 20 year old Congo African Grey Parrot.

Posted on Saturday, February 5, 2011 by Pollyanna Pickering
Pollyanna Pickering - The Art of Business

Many people have a vision of an artist as someone blissfully detached from the realities of life - working only when the muse takes them, floating through life on a cloud of dreamy inspiration as far removed from tax returns and binding contracts as it is possible to be.

Or alternatively they might imagine an impassioned and slightly demented figure, starving poetically in a garret, working feverishly while existing on a diet of scrounged cigarettes and absinthe, never to be recognised in their own lifetime.

The Art of Business
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2011 by Alison Nicholls
Artists for Conservation

In 2007 I was awarded AFC's 5th Flag Expedition Fellowship and had the amazing experience of spending 6 weeks at the Painted Dog Conservation project (PDC) in Zimbabwe, tracking and sketching highly endangered African wild dogs (known as Painted Dogs in Zimbabwe). The main objectives of my project were to raise awareness of this unique and persecuted species and to raise funds for their conservation.

Posted on Monday, January 24, 2011 by Robert Parkin
The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch

In 1504 Hieronymus Bosch, living in the low countries of Northern Europe, applied the last touches to an image that has puzzled the world ever since. "The Garden of Earthly Delights" (1503-1504) seems to suggest a utopian world, yet running through the work are a series of human frailties that end in the ultimate damnation of the human race.

Posted on Saturday, January 15, 2011 by Jeffrey Whiting

As 2011 gets underway, we would like to take a moment to look back at 2010, and celebrate with you a year of success, progress, impact and excitement at AFC.

While conflict, greed, corruption, negligence and natural disasters may have been at the forefront of the world's media headlines throughout 2010, we also witnessed inspiring stories of hope, determination, action and positive change around the world. We would like to think that AFC has been and continues to be at the forefront of leading a story of positive change and impact through what we do and know best - creating awareness about and celebrating our natural world through our art.

To advance AFC's mission of supporting the environment through art, increasing awareness in our communities about the work we do is critical. We have made a major push over the past year to develop the infrastructure and strategy to support our member efforts and significantly grow our visibility online and offline.

2010 Year in Review
Posted on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 by Jeffrey Whiting

What a year 2010 was to reflect upon. Earth rang in the Year of Biodiversity with a prolonged geological belch of ash and rock in Iceland. Eyjafjallajokull (I actually trained myself to pronounce this) - dormant volcano turned mountain-sized orifice - brought travel in Europe to a standstill and disrupted lives around the world.

But if an erupting Icelandic volcano was a belch, than surely, ensuing events in the Gulf of Mexico were tantamount to a human-induced vomit of planetary proportions. For 87 days, the world watched powerlessly with revulsion and despair as 4.9 million barrels of crude oil (or 205 million gallons) gushed into the crystalline waters of the Gulf of Mexico. We now know this to be the worst oil spill in history. As astronauts added another module to the International Space Station on shuttle Atlantis' final voyage, they shared with us how bad the spill looked from space. What will we learn from this?

We can't reflect on the year without mentioning earthquakes in Haiti and Chile that wrought enormous destruction. The resulting extended shutdown of the pulp industry in Chile had a major impact on the availability of paper worldwide. Options for producing a short-run book (such as our Art of Conservation Exhibit Book) on environmentally friendly stock became severely limited. It caused costs to rise and slowed production. It is cause for thought that a single earthquake could have a global impact on printing on sustainably forested paper.

© Copyright 2019 Artists for Conservation Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved. "Artists for Conservation", "AFC" and the butterfly logo are registered trademarks of Artists for Conservation Foundation, Inc. AFC International Foundation is a registered charity in Canada (860891761 RR 0001).