AFC Blog - Featuring compelling articles by nature art and conservation leaders

AFC's Blog

At AFC, our vision is to lead a global artistic movement that inspires individuals and organizations to preserve and sustain our natural heritage by uniting the talent and passion of the world’s most gifted nature artists. This blog has been created as a means for AFC leadership to share thoughts and expertise about topics relating to art and conservation, featuring regular articles by AFC President, Jeff Whiting, and a range of guest bloggers.

Posted on Sunday, October 8, 2017 by AFC
Artists for Conservation

AFC artist Bruce Lawes, recently completed a major arwork depicting a chimpanzee, created specifically to support the Jane Goodall Institute. In this article, Bruce describes the creative process and how his lifelong conservation hero, Dr. Goodall herself contributed to the artwork's completion.

Many of my successful paintings tell a story and are a journey of learning and discovery. Whether I am researching something historical or have the challenge of creating a painting with great personal meaning. ‘Spirit of the Forest’ was both, a journey of the past adventures of an incredible lady and a journey with great personal meaning. Dr. Jane Goodall is my hero since my early childhood and I was determined, not only to create a significant painting, but also create something that she would be proud to say represented a part of her life with fond memories.

With the help of Jane’s wonderful staff in the U.S. they opened their arms in friendship to assist...

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Posted on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 by Jeffrey Whiting

What a year 2010 was to reflect upon. Earth rang in the Year of Biodiversity with a prolonged geological belch of ash and rock in Iceland. Eyjafjallajokull (I actually trained myself to pronounce this) - dormant volcano turned mountain-sized orifice - brought travel in Europe to a standstill and disrupted lives around the world.

But if an erupting Icelandic volcano was a belch, than surely, ensuing events in the Gulf of Mexico were tantamount to a human-induced vomit of planetary proportions. For 87 days, the world watched powerlessly with revulsion and despair as 4.9 million barrels of crude oil (or 205 million gallons) gushed into the crystalline waters of the Gulf of Mexico. We now know this to be the worst oil spill in history. As astronauts added another module to the International Space Station on shuttle Atlantis' final voyage, they shared with us how bad the spill looked from space. What will we learn from this?

We can't reflect on the year without mentioning earthquakes in Haiti and Chile that wrought enormous destruction. The resulting extended shutdown of the pulp industry in Chile had a major impact on the availability of paper worldwide. Options for producing a short-run book (such as our Art of Conservation Exhibit Book) on environmentally friendly stock became severely limited. It caused costs to rise and slowed production. It is cause for thought that a single earthquake could have a global impact on printing on sustainably forested paper.

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